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Submitted on
October 5, 2009
Image Size
1.0 MB
Resolution
1024×819
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Views
148
Favourites
8 (who?)
Comments
12
Downloads
16

Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT
Shutter Speed
1/125 second
Aperture
F/5.6
Focal Length
21 mm
ISO Speed
400
Date Taken
Oct 5, 2009, 1:24:51 PM
×
Need Some Help by phydeau Need Some Help by phydeau
I'm not keeping this up. I'm hoping some photographers can give me advice about how to avoid or fix the haze at the top of the tree line. Every time I try taking pictures of these trees, it ends up looking like the shy is 10 times brighter than it actually is. And I am using a UV filter.


If you got here by a link, there's now a much better version here: [link]
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:iconneswanjeh:
neswanjeh Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2009
polarizers will work best at 90 degrees of the sun ... so it will limit your composition for the photo ... i suggest trying split density filters ...

reading the comments before mine .... i see you already got some help on the metering .... however .... were you shooting at fully auto ? this may explain the high iso ... these camera sets the iso automatically i guess ...
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:iconphydeau:
phydeau Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
It was manual, but I didn't check the ISO. I don't know why it was set to 400. Even indoors, I try not to go above 200 if I don't have to, and I haven't shot indoors in months. I had just assumed it was set at 100.
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:iconsimplistic-illusion:
Simplistic-Illusion Featured By Owner Oct 6, 2009
I think the other's nailed it, I just second it. It's trial and error sometimes :)
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:iconselizabeth:
selizabeth Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
I know someone else suggested a polarizing filter - are you sure the one you are using is made for digital cameras? Older polarizing filters won't work, what you need is a circular one. Also be sure to meter for the sky - right now just about everything is set for way to bright of an exposure.

Alternatively take two exposures - one for the trees, another for the sky, then layer them in photoshop and mask accordingly.
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:iconphydeau:
phydeau Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
I'll look into polarizing filters. Thanks! I did not realize there was a difference for digital.

For still-lifes, I would absolutely go for multiple exposure. In fact, if it was just trees, I'd probably go for HDR. The problem is that I'm worried about shooting a live model under similar conditions.

I think I'll go back tomorrow and play with apertures.
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:iconselizabeth:
selizabeth Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
yup, there is. though I should clarify - the polarizing filter I use that's helped me get a number of shots in my gallery ( [link] [link] [link] [link] [link] ) is actually old, BUT it's a circular filter, meaning it's got a part that attaches to the lens like a normal filter, then a second piece that actually spins so you can angle it according to where the sun is in relation to you.

for a live model I can see the problems - with that you'd probably want to get a flash so that you can meter for the sky then fill in the model with the extra light to get exposed properly as well.
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:iconfemailleturtle:
FeMailleTurtle Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2009  Professional Artisan Crafter
Also, for the time of day you are shooting, your ISO is way high. You might try closing the aperture too - 5.6 is probably as large as that lens goes. Try f/10 or higher.
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:iconphydeau:
phydeau Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Holy crap. How did it get to 400? That would explain the grain problem. ;P
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:iconfemailleturtle:
FeMailleTurtle Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2009  Professional Artisan Crafter
Fix it in lightroom? There's an awesome adjustment brush you can use.

As far as an in-camera fix, maybe try metering off the sky instead of the trees? Try a polarizing filter maybe?

I could be way off, but those are the things I would try first.
Reply
:iconphydeau:
phydeau Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
I tried the polarizing filter, but it didn't seem to have any effect on an overcast sky. I also tried a much faster shutter speed, but when I tried to lighten it in PS, the haze came up with it as well.

I'll have to check out lightroom.
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